Highest and Lowest Energy Bills in the U.S.

July 13, 2017

Homeowners are bracing for the July heat as they prepare for some of their steepest utility bills.

Energy costs in the U.S. consume from 5 to 22 percent of families’ total after-tax income, according to a new analysis by WalletHub, a financial resource.

“And lower energy prices don’t necessarily equate to savings,” WalletHub notes in its study. “Where we live and how much energy we use are a big part of the equation.”

For example, electricity tends to be cheaper in sweltering Southern Louisiana than in Northern California, even though heating and cooling units aren’t needed as much in many areas of the Golden State.

WalletHub compared the total monthly energy bills in each of the 50 states and the District of Columbia. The analysis accounted for residential energy use of electricity, natural gas, motor fuel, and home heating oil.

Most Energy-Expensive States

  • Connecticut: $380 (total energy cost)
  • Alaska: $332
  • Rhode Island: $329
  • Massachusetts: $327
  • Wyoming: $320
  • Georgia: $310
  • Maine: $308
  • Mississippi: $307
  • New Hampshire: $306
  • Vermont: $305

Least Energy-Expensive States

  • District of Columbia: $219 (total energy cost)
  • Washington: $226
  • Colorado: $228
  • Oregon: $246
  • Illinois: $247
  • Iowa: $251
  • Nebraska: $253
  • New Mexico: $256
  • California: $257
  • Arizona: $257

 

Source: WalletHub

Source: “2017’s Most and Least Energy-Expensive States,” WalletHub (July 12, 2017)