Wet vs. Dry Bars: Outdated or On-Trend?

January 2, 2018

Entertainment areas—wet bars and dry bars—are places to prepare beverages for guests. But these spaces may be losing appeal and could make your listing look dated, designers say.

First, make sure you know the difference between a wet bar versus a dry bar. Simply enough, a wet bar has a sink, allowing glasses to easily be rinsed, while a dry bar does not.

Home bars became trendy in the 1970s and 1980s. More homeowners outfitted their basements with rec rooms and added these beverage spaces.

But some real estate pros don’t advise adding one in to sell a house. They say the amenity can look dated. With open kitchens and living areas, installing a second sink for a wet bar is often viewed as unnecessary, since the kitchen sink tends to be nearby.

“Almost no one is installing a traditional wet bar in their home," Rikki Klein, a Los Angeles bar designer and builder, told realtor.com®. “Wet bars can be pretty unnecessary and redundant for the modern style of entertaining.”

But they’re not totally extinct. With the growing popularity of outdoor kitchens, wet bars are becoming a trendy addition outside the home.

Also, these add-on spaces may be viewed as more sought-after in a man cave or entertainment room, particularly a dry bar.

“The trend is leaning toward a dry bar, where favorite liquors and glassware are artfully and conveniently displayed,” says Klein.

A dry bar would be relatively easy to stage, too. Just mark a dedicated spot to display bar wares, add a beverage refrigerator, and have a little counter and cabinet space. No extra plumbing is required with a dry bar. A dry bar can also be viewed as multifunctional for storing other home supplies. Some homeowners are even modifying the back of their kitchen island or counter with some shelves or rollout drawers for a dry bar.

Source: “What Is a Wet Bar vs. Dry Bar—and Does Either Belong in Your Home?” realtor.com® (Dec. 29, 2017)