Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock's home

© Gabe Ginsberg/Getty Images News

The remains of a home in Mesquite, Nev., formerly owned by Las Vegas shooter Stephen Paddock after authorities raided it.

Vegas Shooting Victims to Get Proceeds From Sale of Gunman’s Homes

August 10, 2018

Two homes for sale in Las Vegas formerly belonged to Stephen Paddock, the man who carried out the deadliest mass shooting in U.S. history. The homes are listed in Mesquite and Las Vegas, and all proceeds of the sales will be sent to the shooting victims’ families.

Paddock, 64, opened fire on hundreds of concertgoers attending the Route 91 Harvest festival on Oct. 1, 2017, blanketing the area with gunshots from the 32nd floor of his Mandalay Bay hotel room. He killed 58 people and injured hundreds more. It was the deadliest mass shooting in modern American History. Paddock turned the gun on himself before police were able to enter his room.

Paddock’s Mesquite home has been listed for $449,000, while his Reno home is listed for $399,000. The listing states: “This was Stephen Paddock’s house. All net proceeds go to the victims [sic] families. This is an estate sale and is subject to court approval.”

Real estate professionals in Nevada are not required to disclose to potential buyers if a property was owned by a notorious person. Some real estate pros are unsure whether the homes will carry stigma from their former owner, even though no one ever died in either of the homes. Currently, his home in Mesquite is the second most expensive listing in Sun City, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reports.

Paddock was “so notorious and so despicable that the real estate will be impacted,” real estate appraiser Randall Bell, from Landmark Research Group in Laguna Beach, Calif., told realtor.com®. “Anytime you get this association with trauma and death and negative events, the real estate can be negatively impacted.”

Paddock’s homes are being sold as part of his probate case. If an accepted bid is received, it will still need to be approved by the court.

Paddock had no will when he died. His mother became the sole heir by default and elected to have nothing to do with his assets, the Las Vegas Review-Journal reports. She signed a document in March to transfer all of Paddock’s assets “to the estates of the victims who died as a result of the October 1st Las Vegas shooting, in equal shares.”