living room

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8 Ways to Make a Space Feel Larger

Clients feeling cramped at home? These tips can help open up a room without knocking down a wall.

September - October
2020

Clients feeling cramped at home? These tips can help open up a room without knocking down a wall.

  1. Accentuate the vertical. Draw the eye upward so a room looks more spacious. Add a bookshelf that reaches to the ceiling. Install vertical shiplap or wallpaper with vertical stripes. Hang a pendant light fixture.
  2. Consider “see-through” furniture. Choose chairs and sofas with visible legs instead of furniture with skirts that reach the floor. This allows you to see under and around pieces so they appear to float in the room rather than dominate it. Glass coffee tables are a good choice, too.
  3. Lighten up surroundings. We all know white walls reflect light and makes a room look bigger. But why stop there? HouseLogic recommends painting walls, ceilings, and trim the same shade of white to present a soaring, bright space.
  4. Go big with accents. Many people think small when designing a small room. Instead, add a couple of oversized accessories, like a big piece of art or a single large chair. A lot of little objects make a room appear cluttered while one or two big ones make it feel more spacious.
  5. Get away from the wall. Create a central layout instead of pushing a sofa up against the wall. When there’s a wall right next to a piece of furniture, your eyes are drawn to the wall, which can make the room seem more cramped.
  6. Simplify the color scheme. Use a monochromatic color scheme for walls, furniture, and accessories. When objects are a similar color, your eye doesn’t dwell on each one but rather sees them in a unified, uncomplicated form.
  7. Skip the curtains. Curtains block natural light and the view to the outdoors, making a room feel smaller and darker.
  8. Bring nature indoors. Add plants and use natural textures in furniture to tie indoor decor to the outdoor view that’s visible through the windows that aren’t blocked by curtains.

Sources: Denise Balassi, Spaces Of Distinction; Laura Britt, Britt Design Group; Melissa Grove, Laura U Interior Design; HouseLogic.com

Residential Styles & Structural Elements

Regency

Regency
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